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Kimbo's Activity Tip Page
(See below for previous tips.)

TAKE A MOVEMENT BREAK - AND SWITCH ON

YOUR BRAIN - WITH RONNO!

Use movement anytime to get the brain humming and the body pumping.

1) Everyone drink some water. Have your students imagine they are plants drinking the water. Imagine sucking the water up through your toes, with the water going all the way up your legs to your arms, fingers, and brain. 

Remember to drink the water slowly so it doesn't go out your roots too quickly.

2) Have your students rub the soft tissue area just below the collarbone (to the right and left of the sternum) for about 30 seconds. This brings blood to the brain.

3) Get your students to alternately touch opposite hand to opposite knee, or right hand to left foot, followed by left hand to right foot.  Students can be encouraged  to kick their legs back and try touching opposite hand to opposite foot. These movements can be done sitting or standing, with eyes open or closed.

4) COOL DOWN: Have your students sit with legs crossed. Then cross arms on chest, making an “X.”  Students gently press their tongue to the roof of their mouth to relax their body and prepare their brain for easier learning.

This warm-up routine can be enhanced by playing upbeat children's songs such as RONNO's  “I Like Me,” or “The Best Me.”

Other RONNO songs that can be played which already incorporate movements for children to follow are: “Jump Start for the Queen of Hearts,” “I Can Dance,” “ It's Alright,”  “Pelican Polka,” “Twist Stop Hop,” “Tongue-Twister Twist,” and “Poor Princess Polly,” (to name a few).  Please see song list below to find out where each song mentioned here appears on a RONNO CD.

LET'S MARCH!

Students in the early years need to develop a sense of left and right-sidedness. March to RONNO's “Hurray March!”, from Positively Singable Songs, or any song that has a marching beat. Start off marching like a puppet, imagining a string is attached from your right palm to your right knee. As your right hand goes up, the invisible string attached to the right knee goes up. Imagine another string attached to your left palm and your left knee. Have students move on the spot or around the room moving in this homo-lateral type of movement.

To integrate the right and left hemisphere of the brain, encourage students to move as they did in step 3 (above).These contra-lateral (i.e., opposite side of the body) movements activate the brain for spelling, writing, listening, reading, and comprehension.

MOVEMENT IS THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT STIMULATOR OF THE BRAIN!


 

     

      

 RONNO
B.A., B. Ed

Kimbo's Award-Winning Artist

Singer, Composer, Educator 

 

 

Ronno ...an internationally acclaimed children's performer,

award-winning recording artist and educator, crafts quality

songs for kids, and has amassed a catalogue of over 160

published works to date.

 

Song Support/RONNO

www.RonnoSong.com

1-877-465-7010

Song List:                                          CD's

 

I Like Me                                             Positively Singable Songs

Be The Best Me                                   Fun 'N Friendly 

Jump-Start for the Queen of Hearts        Castles, Knights & Unicorns

I Can Dance                                         Yes, I Can Songs

It's Alright!                                            Fun 'N Friendly Songs

Pelican Polka                                       Yes, I Can Songs

Twist Stop Hop                                     Jump-Start Action Songs

Poor Princess Polly                              Castles, Knights & Unicorns

 


Previous Tips

•  Alliteration
   Activity Tips (2/06) - Pam Schiller, Ph.D.

•  A Case for Laughing Giggling and Having Fun 
   Activity Tips (11/05) - Pam Schiller, Ph.D.

•  Connecting Music and Literacy
   Activity Tips (8/05) - Pam Schiller, Ph.D.

•  The Learning Station: Teaching with Songs in Your Heart
   Activity Tips (7/04) - Laurie Monopoli

•  Bean Bag
   Activity Tips (3/04) - Christina Chapman

•  Activities to Integrate Music and Language Arts
   Activity Tips (8/03) - Cindy H. Clark, MMed, MT-BC


Activity Tips for Special Needs and Young Children